Pomegranates + Patience

Was at my parents’ home the other night. Beautiful/decent/wise people… who I deeply appreciate. Whenever I go over, the fridge always seems to contain plastic containers full of pomegranate seeds. These little treasures are super healthy, fantastically tasty and overall pleasures that elevate life. I never really thought about where they came from. Just ate them.

This morning I was saying good morning to my Mom on the phone. Got onto the topic of pomegranate seeds because I’d dropped off a brilliant device I’ve discovered for getting the seeds out of the fruit without the achingly painstakingly complex process of doing it by hand (try it once and you’ll get what I mean). Mom: “I’ll try it but your Dad takes out all those seeds for me himself every night. He knows we love them. So quietly, he does this for us.”

As I write, I reflect on my father’s patience. And on the metaphor of pomegranate seeds. Much goes through my mind as I think about this. One thing is the power of patience. In a world gone hyperSpeed, patience is a stunning success behavior. My Dad’s patience in doing something kind+thoughtful+loving for his loved ones. The patience of an entrepreneur toiling in solitude, advancing a dream that nobody gets. The patience of a teacher developing young minds amid fewer resources. The patience of a leader, building an organization that delivers awesome value for the people it’s blessed to serve.

Not sure if I’m making my point clearly. I’ll reflect on it more over the days that come. But patience truly is a virtue. Of the finest of leaders. And the very best of Dad’s.

Keep Leading Without a Title.

Robin Sharma

P.S. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

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37 Responses to “Pomegranates + Patience”

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Serbond, Steve L. Vernon. Steve L. Vernon said: Pomegranates + Patience: Was at my parents’ home the other night. Beautiful/decent/wise people… who I de… http://bit.ly/e86VE1 [...]

  2. Brahm Memone says:

    Our energies extend beyond our physical into what we do, transferring our love into it.
    Who we are is not what we do. Who we are is not that which occurs to the seeing eye, in the silence of the unseen eye, there we exist as the Spirit. Our work nor what we do defines that aspect of us. And when we transfer this aspect of us into what we do we have contributed that part of us to others.
    Being in the flow as each seed is extracted carefully this synergy of love is transferred to those your Dad loves.

    Thanks for sharing Robin,
    Have an Awesome day,
    Brahm Memone

  3. sumeet says:

    superb post.patience is an excellent virtue everyone must strive to build on.

  4. Pomegranates are a superfood and I had tonight, so I know what you mean about “the achingly painstakingly complex process of doing it by hand”.

    The first thought about your blog post is about how sweet is your father in having this loving and caring thought for your mother and others of the family. Then, of course, I thought about the patience of him, his dedication, commitment with all his heart and focused attention. A quote came into my mind:

    “The most desired gift of Love is not diamonds or roses or chocolate. It is FOCUSED ATTENTION”. ~ Richard Warren

    In Italy, we say: “Patience is the virtue of the strong ones!”

    Another thought: we are the “product” of our parents, in terms of values and attitudes.
    If today, you are in a certain way, it’s of course thanks to you, but also to your parents, who gave you great values. I guess Bianca and Colby have great values, too!

    Thanks for this lovely blog post.

    Linda Lattuca

    P.S. Post the photo of the device on Plixi, please! LOL :)

  5. “The patience of an entrepreneur toiling in solitude, advancing a dream that nobody gets.”

    - well put

  6. Kaleo Farias says:

    Aloha E Robin,

    Alignment with “True North Principles.” Respecting & Acknowledging “The Law Of Nature.” We all do “Reap what we Sow.” I know that each and everyone of us Robin will appreciate this blog. Looking forward to more inspirational and thoughtful blogs like this in the future.

  7. Harshi says:

    Hi Robin,

    Great comparison! Patience is indeed a virtue esp. in today’s fast world and workplaces, where everyone seems to expect quick results and onto the next thing, and one can get breathless just catching up. I have to remind myself to slow down and do everything I do with patience, presence, and attention, with easy breaths thrown in. I think that time expands with patience and there’s nothing to lose.

    I was reminded of children who come to study where I work, a learning center. With some of them, it’s a great challenge to have them stay engaged and on task. The first instinct inside is a tinge of impatience, but I immediately align myself to what is needed. Someone referred to it as a “problem” but I want to see this as an amazing opportunity to develop patience. It’s beautiful how challenges come to teach and develop sides of us. Ditto with parents as they expect children to be moved to the next level in learning, and we have to explain to them how we cannot hurry children along before they master the current concept. I like this organizational value.

    Loved these lines..: “The patience of an entrepreneur toiling in solitude, advancing a dream that nobody gets. The patience of a teacher developing young minds amid fewer resources. The patience of a leader, building an organization that delivers awesome value for the people it’s blessed to serve.”

    Wonderful to have such patient, loving parents and it’s lovely to know you spent time with them!
    Thanks for the post Robin..
    Aware of infusing patience in whatever I do,
    Harshi

  8. Harshi says:

    “Small daily improvements lead to stunning results over time.” Robin, thank you for always spreading this idea.. my thinking now automatically goes to that thread when am doing something. Every step adds up. The value of patience in achieving a goal speaks through this.

  9. Aniseh, Toronto says:

    Hi Robin,

    Lovely post.. There are not too many men like your dad! But then maybe there arn’t too many women like your mom!

    I wish you had posted a photo of the device that you discovered for removing those juicy little seeds! The fruit is a favourite in my home but it is such a painful task cleaning it. Alas for patience! By cleaning I mean removing the seeds! Eating the fruit takes me back to hot summer evenings in Karachi, watching TV, scooping the seeds from this big yellow bowl, sprinkling it with some sort of salt and spice and watching Little House on the Praire with the inlaws!

    Lots of time and water under a bridge. Undoubtedly patience is the virtuest of virtues.
    Regards
    Aniseh

  10. Shelley says:

    The subject of patience is definitely a timely one for me, and this post as even more special for me because I had the pleasure of spending time with your dad in breakout sessions at the last ABS weekend.

    We all want to hurry to the end, but the important thing is to learn to enjoy the journey.

  11. Pomegranates are good, it’s juice also same, the seeds too more good, all these are good health wise. a Pakistan boy prepared ‘Pakoda’ (kind of short eats using them and presented to us. Father is far more than that and I respect him much more.

  12. Kunal Supe says:

    Its an amazing metaphor. Applies to both personal and corporate life…!

  13. Kamal151 says:

    Patience is a must ,patience is wise,patience bring meaning to life.

  14. anu says:

    Would love to see a photo of your family Mr Sharma, esp that of your parents.

  15. robin says:

    interesting comments everyone. seems we agree patience is so important to leadership and life at mastery. thanks for your posts!

  16. Allison says:

    It is also rather ironic that your father’s patience and loving act involves a pomegranate – it is very symbolic in many religions – a very powerful fruit in many ways! In the Jewish religion it is traditional to eat pomegranate on our New Year – it has 613 seeds which correspond with our 613 commandments – many of these are seen as good deeds – your father is certainly doing a good deed or ‘mitzvot’ as we say!

  17. Arun Sharma says:

    “I’ll try it but your Dad takes out all those seeds for me himself every night. He knows we love them. So quietly, he does this for us.”

    What a selfless act of love! …. and of course, patience!

  18. You’ve clearly made your point here Robin. And I get it and I’m sure most people do too. Patience is surely what anyone and everyone with a vision and a dream needs to be able to get where they want to go but sometimes due to some circumstances, happenings in life, and those around us some of us are not able to get the patience to wait for our dreams and visions to come true, which is very sad. I have a dream and vision and I know with all the patience in the world I would get there. I’m having patience by not listening to the naysayers and discouragers around me and just looking straight at my dream.

    Thanks for this very great post. I got the lesson the very moment you said your dad took the time to remove the seeds for you all :)).

  19. Chitra Sivasankar says:

    Well said lines.

    “The patience of an entrepreneur toiling in solitude, advancing a dream that nobody gets. The patience of a teacher developing young minds amid fewer resources. The patience of a leader, building an organization that delivers awesome value for the people it’s blessed to serve.”

    I am so much inspired by this. How can you just take the positive energy from even the small things? Pomegranates+patience wow..I never thought of relating this with anything else. Thank you :)

  20. Pedro says:

    Genius post, Robin. I have something to add.

    Do you think it would have the same impact if HE told you what he was doing?

    I always think about that.

    Cheers.

  21. Raj Mone says:

    As I read the blog, I was reminded of my childhood when my mother would maually take out the pomegranate seeds (anar ke daane) for me and my sisters. She would often peel as many as 8-10 pomegranates which we would voraciously hog. Whenever we would offer our mother to eat some, she would say that she would have them later. But she would never eat those and keep trhem all for us siblings.

    Not that pomegranates were expensively out of our reach, or that she did not like eating them; it was just that my mother chose to sacrifice something that her children savoured. So, it is the industrious patience and noble sacrifice combined. That is a virtue that my wife has developed since she has become a mother–keeping the best of the things for our children! These qualities, i think, characterize parents… everywhere!!

    Thanks for eliciting the fond memories!!!

    Raj Mone

  22. radhu says:

    hi robin,
    ur dad is gr8. thanks for sharing this moment with us. wonderful.
    how old is ur dad?. jus out of curiosity.

  23. ramaa says:

    seriously, ma dad also does evrytng out of lov. Really wise ppl r vry patient too. thnQ sir, i got d meaning of wat u said n am rly rly proud of ma dad

  24. mahesh says:

    Patience , passion and persistence the 3ps of sucess. thanks .

  25. Navya says:

    To be honest I don’t quite aggree with you Robin, I have never felt it ( “….getting the seeds out of the fruit without the achingly painstakingly complex process…. “) that hard. But yes patience is a virtue.

  26. Virna Lisa says:

    I love eating pomegranates for the same reason, going through the process of getting each kernel and eating it. I crush some of the seeds and put it on my face – they have great anti aging properties.

  27. pomigranates says:

    hi this is lalli i like pomigranates

  28. pomigranates says:

    hi i like pomigranates

  29. pomigranates says:

    i love eating pomigranates

  30. Ajit Anandan says:

    Like father Like son, I am pretty sure Robinji has the patience to do the same for his kids…

  31. Kunal says:

    It reminded me of the time my uncles would offer us pomegranates, such a wonderful fruit/vege, if looked at very carefully it looks like a ruby, indeed it is one, anyways to do with patience, it is indeed a great virtue that brings about positive results.

  32. Hemanth says:

    My father and uncle do it every time we are there. We always kind of took it for granted. Thanks for the post. I and my siblings are going to discuss it the next time we connect.

  33. [...] 1) I love pomegranates, and 2) who can’t use more patience?   The following article by Robin Sharma is short and  started my day on a great foot, I hope you enjoy as well [...]

  34. Shashi says:

    One more thoughtful lessons we can learn from pomegranates is about its integration and bonding!! God has really a great master who made this fruit which shows us how he arranged this fruit with great discipline, great integration and great bonding”.

    It also teaches a lesson that though its outer cover is fleshy, tasty and smooth, inner seed is very hard and your teeth feels it :)

    What a great thought from God : Master of this universe – Kudos to you!!

  35. Excellent post even so Let me tell you that I think there is problem with your RSS feeds when they seem to not be working for me. May be just me but I thought I would note it.

  36. Trupti says:

    Hi Robin a nice eg I think u can write a proper book on patience i am in search of a book on patience. Hope u write it. I appreciate ur work.Have a nice day

  37. Praveen says:

    HI Robin

    Many thanks for motivating us……whenever I read you, it gives an immediate trigger and makes me aware of my inertia…….my dream is a multiversity where everything can be enjoyed and learned….

    regards
    praveen

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